Chronic Lumbalgia

Dorina Ruci, Vilson Ruci

Abstract


In literature there is a confusion about the etymology and the prevalence of lumbar pain, especially for chronic lumbar pain. Chronic lumbar pain generally defines that kind of a kind of chronic pathology which lasts more than 7-12 weeks. Some of the other authors define it as chronic disorder which is extended beyond the time that a cure or significant improvement is expected. Several authors have found a correlation between chronic back pain with a certain socioeconomic status and psychological or sociological problems of patients. Private or public health insurance companies use other criteria and often different for chronic lumbagos definition based on the financial compensation paid by them over a period of time. An average of 25-30% of people have at least one episode of lumbago in the last three months with a touchscreen that runs at 75-80% over the life of an adult person. In our study were included 469 patients from 35-65 years and were followed for a period of two years 43% (201 patients) females, 57% (268 patients) males.

Keywords: back pain, lumbago, hernia, vertebral column.


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.0001/(aj).v3i6.460

DOI (PDF): http://dx.doi.org/10.0001/(aj).v3i6.460.g1489

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